Wayne Rooney at Peacock for first team Luncheon

Wayne Rooney at Peacock for first team Luncheon

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An honor to have the entire #DCunited team with us, big Thanks @waynerooney @birnbaum15 for hosting your first team luncheon with us. Wonderful to have all the players.

DC has a genuine world celebrity in its midst. Wayne Rooney recently signed with D.C. United, and as the Washington Post has noted, he has more Twitter followers than all of DC’s sports teams and their biggest stars combined. In his native Britain, Rooney’s hairline is a matter of national importance. But in Washington, Guardian reporter Les Carpenter discovered, very few people know who he is.

This is probably a nice change for Wayne Rooney, who can’t even get away with a drunken VW ride back home. This is an ever-more worldly place, but the planet’s most popular sport still commands a smaller percentage of the region’s mental real estate than hockey. So don’t forget to check out Clarendon, Wayne Rooney!

In fact, you could argue that Rooney will be the rare global celebrity who simultaneously will be what we call “Washington famous”—subject to wall-to-wall tabloid coverage back home, but engendering the sort of quiet, recognizing-Janet Napolitano-makes-me-part-of-the-cosmopolitan-tribe thrill here inside the Beltway. For many people here, intermittent fame is the ideal. It’s what lets you fill Politics and Prose during your book talk and then dine in peace across the street. (That unwritten compact used to cover most administration officials, too, but it’s now off.) It’s also one of the underappreciated reasons for living here: You can do work that touches a lot of people and still have plenty of elbow room at the farmers market. The fame Wayne Rooney enjoyed in Britain looks more like the type of fame young people expect–dumb nicknamesintriguesordid sex scandals. Here he’ll be able to go to work, come home, and maybe even go to dinner without making Playbook. He’ll of course need to avoid David Brooks if this is what he wants.